Monthly Archives: January 2016

Learn How to Draw for Beginners

How to Draw for Beginners

The first step of learning to draw is figuring out what drawing tools you want to work with and gaining an awareness of what your chosen drawing medium is capable of. Working with a graphite pencil is quite a different experience and utilizes a completely different process than working with a stick of charcoal or oil pastel or pen and ink or colored pencil. Drawing : The Complete Course and Jill Bays’ drawing video workshop can really help you reach your fullest potential by giving you an understanding of the different drawing techniques used with different drawing media. For example, if you want to really work on your mark-making with an emphasis on hatching or cross-hatching, you’ll probably want to work with graphite. For more expressive marks, reach for charcoal.

Drawing Basics: Initial Tips for Learning to Draw

When you start to draw the first thing you will want to do is loosen up—literally. You want to draw fluidly and spontaneously, so the first thing I was always taught to do is warm up with exercises like drawing circles or cubes. This gets your hand and eye working in concert and can bring about a certain level of focus that you’ll need as you start to sketch.

Another of our drawing tips that I’d like to share is to be mindful that as you learn to draw you don’t have to erase. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you must. Oftentimes, “incorrect” marks can be guidelines for you as you zero-in on the right way to draw the curved shape of a vase or tilt of the nose. Leaving those marks—known as pentimenti—is something that master draftsmen have done for centuries, so you can too.

Take it Up a Notch: Learn to Draw Portraits

As you get more comfortable with how to draw, take your drawing tools and create a realistic drawing of someone you love. This is one of the greatest things about drawing—it offers us an incredible opportunity to celebrate the world around us while sharpening our drawing skills. Drawing is a way of bringing your art and your everyday life closer together. That can be especially powerful when creating a realistic drawing of someone you love. If you are an absolute portrait drawing beginner or want to brush up on the skills that, for a draftsman, never get old, check out Drawing Portraits for the Absolute Beginner and Lee Hammond’s video on drawing lifelike portraits, which delve into the essentials of learning to draw a person and gives drawing instructions on how to move beyond a likeness to capture something really unique about your chosen model. One great drawing lesson I will always remember is the importance of sitting and observing your model: the tilt of their head, how they carry their body weight, where they naturally put their hands at rest, and so on.

Learn to Draw What You See : Your World!

Indeed, the best way to approach learning how to draw is to hone your observational skills. A great resource to help you fine tune your hand-eye coordination is the how to draw book, How to See—How to Draw by Claudia Nice. Nice teaches you that as a drawer, you reinterpret the world through line, lighting, and shading. These are the tools you need to create objects and figures on paper, but rendering three-dimensional objects on a piece of paper with them is often a matter of two drawing essentials that you should always keep in mind: proportion and value. Knowing how to draw well is truly often a matter of getting the right proportions of a face or body or landscape, and applying the correct level of light and shadow to them. If you can do that, you are well on your way to learning how to draw anything and everything you want.

And beyond practice there’s no secret to learning how to draw well. Instead, it just takes practice and acknowledging that not every drawing is going to be a work of art you want to frame. So learn the lesson I still struggle so hard with when it comes to learning to draw, and cut yourself some slack and enjoy the process!

 

Quick and Easy Oil Painting Techniques for Beginners

Learn Oil Painting Techniques for Tinting Strength

Knowing how to use oil paints starts with discovering the tinting strength of each color on your oil painting palette. For example, Prussian blue and alizarin crimson have very strong tinting strengths just a small amount of either color added to white makes a vivid tint. On the other hand, terre verte and raw umber have weaker tinting strength and turn pale when mixed with just a little bit of white. A beginner oil painting lesson you can teach yourself right now is adding the same amount of white to each color on your palette to see how each pigment is affected.

How to Use Oil Paints with Impasto Effects

Building up the surface of a painting with thick and loose applications of paint is one of my favorite oil painting techniques, and it is known as impasto. First, there is just such a sensual pleasure in moving the buttery paint around in this way. And the fact that you can also leave behind the marks made with your brush makes the activity an expressive one and one of the most valuable abstract oil painting techniques worth exploring. To practice with impasto, you will want to keep the paint thick enough to stand on its own though many artists will add a little medium so it is slightly more workable. And then you just get in there, applying the paint with a brush (flat brushes are ideal as they hold a lot of paint) or painting knife, and being sure to paint with purpose. What I mean is use impasto to good effect, whether by applying it to visually contrast with smoother areas of your paint or use it on a whole oil painting for a three-dimensional quality.

Top Oil Painting Lessons, Tips and Techniques on Blending

You might think that blending is one of the easiest oil painting techniques to employ, and it is in that you can practice it starting right now on just about any figure, landscape, or object you paint. But there are specific oil painting lessons on how to blend that are key if you want to know how to use oil paints like a master.

Blending at its most basic simply involves learning how to oil paint by brushing and rebrushing the areas where two different colors meet, so that they seem to merge together seamlessly. But you can also blend by stroking one color over the edge of the next the brushstrokes are obvious but the blended area is still created. You can also, as a final step in an oil painting, trace a brush over the entire surface of a painting or concentrating in the areas where you want to knock down the visible brushstrokes so that no trace of the brush path are visible.

The Secrets of Perspective Drawing Made Easy

Why  knowing how to Draw perspective is important?

I will be the first to admit that learning and practicing linear perspective is a little bit like eating your veggies when you are a kid. You aren’t sure about them even though you know they are good for you but, in the end, you learn to love them. But what is really worth remembering about perspective drawing is that if you know the basics, you’ve got all the capabilities of a 3d drawing in your hands. That’s why understanding linear perspective is so important for artists, beginners included.

Linear perspective revolutionized the way artists perceived and incorporated spatial depth in their work. Established in solid, mathematical terms in the 15th century, linear perspective creates the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface.

Telling the Difference Between One-Point Perspective and Two-Point Perspective

To create effective linear perspective, artists establish a horizon line, a vanishing point on that line, and multiple orthogonal, or vanishing, lines. The horizon line is a horizontal line that runs across the paper or canvas to represent the viewer’s eye level and delineates the sky meeting the ground.The orthogonal lines, which distort objects by foreshortening them, create the optical illusion that objects grow smaller and closer together as they get farther away. These imaginary lines recede on the paper to meet at one point on the horizon called the vanishing point.

The difference between one-point perspective and two-point perspective is the number of vanishing points and where they are placed on the horizon line. For more on the basics of drawing perspective, consider the digital download of our best-selling perspective drawing workshop, Perspective Made Simple, which breaks down all of linear perspective into simple, focused steps that anyone can learn.

Practicing Your Perspective Drawing Lessons: Where to Start

When first learning how to incorporate perspective into your composition, concentrate on one-point perspective with one vanishing point (two-point perspective and three-point perspective use two and three vanishing points, respectively). One-point perspective is helpful when drawing or painting roads, railroad tracks, or buildings that directly face the viewer.

 According to linear-perspective instructor Patrick Connors, “The components of perspective are three: the eye (the artist or viewer), the picture plane, and the figure (or object). The science is about the relationship among the three. An introduction to perspective will enhance an artist’s appreciation for the perceptual underpinnings of the illusions of space.”

So feel confident in your knowledge of the basics of perspective drawing. They can take you wherever you want to go, artistically speaking, and allow artists just like you to create illusionistic spaces in their drawings and paintings that look incredibly real. Enjoy!

Step by step Drawing Lessons for Beginners

Successful artists always seem to list drawing art as the constant “helping hand” activity that they go back to when they are stumped and need to refresh themselves or sharpen their techniques. Through simple drawings, you can make discoveries about your own artistic style and further enhance how you see.

Drawing Basics : Love the Line

Drawing ideas often spring from the medium itself. A stray mark or pencil stroke can bring to mind so many possibilities, from the feathers on an owl’s wing to the profile of distant mountain peaks. That’s why it is so important to spend time just free drawing that will give you the opportunity to learn to love line.

So take time as you work through drawing tutorials to work only with line. Create simple drawings using hatchings and crosshatchings alone. Discover how you can layer line, or use different sides of your implement for smooth and crisp marks or smeary strokes. Decent drawing tutorials will tell you the same because drawing basics like this are what allow you to really command the best from the medium, be it graphite, charcoal, pastels, or any other implement you choose to draw with.

Drawing Tutorials: Use the Negative Space

Drawing for beginners also means learning to see and to draw negative space as well as positive space. In other words, spend time drawing the shapes of the space around objects as well as the objects themselves.

It sounds easy, but oftentimes this basic drawing idea is hard to truly understand until you actually do it. But once you capture a few angles, the negative space will take as much prominence in your drawing as the object you are drawing.

Continue working on negative space and other simple drawing techniques with the Complete Drawing Course. Even if you never went to art school, learning to draw with this at-home study course is completely within your grasp!

Drawing Lessons: Don’t Use Symbols

One of the best drawing exercises you can practice involves symbols or, actually, resisting the temptation to use symbols. You see, when you start to learn drawing, there is always the urge to draw objects or figures as shapes, ovals for eyes for example. But in reality, the structure and shape of eyes is nothing like an oval. Instead, you must use light and shadow and proportion to truly capture a person’s eyes in your drawing.

To practice this, sit in front of a mirror with a lamp tilted over your face to create strong light and shadow shapes. Practice creating a basic drawing of the abstract shapes of light and shadow on the features of your face. Creating a drawing step by step in this way frees you to see abstractly and that is the secret to drawing art. You learn to draw what you see, not what you think you see.